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Entries in seeds (2)

Friday
Jan182013

Farmer Friday – Sowing Seeds for Spring with Fresh & Fancy Farms

 I haven’t had a fresh tomato in four months. It’s not because they’re not available to me, because they are. It’s because they don’t taste half as good as when they’re in season and I’m not even going to get into the nutrients involved. Instead, I will pine over seed catalogs and wait for the snow to stop. 

While looking through catalogs, the first thing I ask myself is, what do I want to eat? Immediately, heirloom tomatoes, multicolor carrots and eggplants come to mind (among other things). I check out the seeds I saved the season before and make sure I don’t double up. Now that I know what I want to eat, the next question is, how do I want to eat it? One thing to note is the closer your fruits and vegetables are grown to your location, the higher the nutrient count and the fresher they will taste. This means you won’t have to do much for a delicious dish.

Here are a few ideas:
Eggplant Bruschetta

What You Need:
Eggplant (Black beauty, Rosa bianca)
Heirloom Tomatoes (Marvel Striped, Tigerella)
Fresh Basil
Olive Oil
Salt
Pepper
What To Do:
Slice eggplant into 1’’ rounds. Soak in cool water for a minute. Eggplants are like sponges, so if you let them drink olive oil first, the finishing product could be on the mushy side. Remove eggplant rounds from the water and lay them flat on a baking sheet. Brush on olive oil and top with some salt and fresh pepper. Throw in the oven for 15 minutes on 375. Remove baking tray from the oven and flip the eggplant, top with some salt and pepper and bake for 5 more minutes. Chop tomatoes, basil and mix with olive oil, salt and pepper. Top eggplant, open up a bottle of red wine and enjoy!
Note: Use a fork & knife, unless you’re with your parents...they have to love you.

Sweet Roasted Carrots

What You Need:
Colorful Carrot Mix (St. Valery Orange, Dragon Purple, Yellowstone and White Satin)
Olive Oil
Fresh Rosemary
Local Honey (Try Andrew’s Honey in Union Square on Wednesday)
Salt
Pepper
What To Do:
Cut carrots into 1/2” rounds. Toss with olive oil, chopped rosemary, salt and pepper. Roast at 375 for 15 minutes. Remove from oven, coat with honey and throw them back in for 15 more minutes. These make a great solo side, or mix them into some quinoa and throw in some dried fruit and nuts for a quick meal. This spring is the first season Fresh & Fancy Farms will be offering fresh fruits and vegetables to the public. We will also feature cooking classes and even a few taught by Elana! Stay tuned for updates class spots will be limited!
A few newbies to the Fresh & Fancy garden in 2013:
Edamame
Colorful Beets (Detroit Dark Red, Chioggia (the ones with the red & white rings, Bull’s Blood and Golden Beets)
Purple Dove Beans
Fresh & Fancy Farms
575 River Road
New Milford, NJ 07646
201.483.9494
freshandfancyfarms.com
facebook.com/freshfancyfarms
twitter.com/freshfancyfarms

 

Friday
Oct212011

What To Do With a Pumpkin...We begin with roasting.

I would like a show of hands: How many of you walk by a pumpkin stand/farmer's market/any place they are selling pumpkins and get one for the sole purpose of carving it as a Jack-O-Lantern?

I'm not saying this is a bad thing – in fact The Box and I have a running yearly competition for the best carved pumpkin. Who do you think wins every year? I'll give you three guesses and the first two don't count.

But resigning the pumpkin to the realm of holiday decor really limits its capabilities in the edibility department. Because it is a very capable vegetable, people. I mean, look how robust it is! How....ORANGE!

So today, we begin with dissecting the pumpkin and pilfering its edible parts. We will eventually make stuff with these parts, but today we pilfer. Let it begin!

What You Need:

1 pumpkin (I like using the small sugar pumpkins. They are cute. Plus, I'm only one girl, how much pumpkin do you want me to eat?)

Roasting pan or baking sheet

A sharp knife

A large scooping spoon

A cutting board

What To Do:

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.

Using a large knife and cutting board and being VERY CAREFUL, cut the top off your pumpkin like so:

Scoop out the seeds and pumpkin guts.

The seeds are one of the pumpkin's edible parts. Try to separate them from the stringy guts (not so tasty), rinse them and let them dry. Find a safe place to keep them for a little while, like an air-tight container. We'll be coming back to them.

Slice your pumpkin in half and then into wedges. Place it in your roasting pan, or on a baking sheet.

Bake in the oven for 45 minutes or until the meat of the pumpkin is fork-tender (like a cooked potato).

The skin will blister a bit, and once the pumpkin has cooled, you can peel back the skin and — violá — edible pumpkin meat!

Stick it in the fridge as is, or cube it up.

Next week: Things to do with roasted, toasted pumpkin meat!