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Entries in Roasted Pumpkin (6)

Tuesday
Nov222011

A Plethora of Pumpkin Recipes – Our Second Online Magazine!

 

 

It's time! For two things: Thanksgiving and (even more exciting) our SECOND online magazine!

This magazine delivers you all our featured pumpkin recipes PLUS a very exciting new one. I haven't even posted it on the blog, that's how special it is.

What is it? Maybe you should flip through the magazine and find out, huh? I dare you....I DOUBLE mini pumpkin cheesecake dare you.

Yes, I do.

Tuesday
Nov012011

Pumpkin Butter Makes Everything Better

We are returning to pumpkin-related recipes today with a winner. First, a qualification of sorts: I don't know much about preserving, canning, jamming and related topics. I occasionally scan the internet for ideas, getting really exciting about making things like fig and lavender jam. Make it, and then exhaust myself on the whole process.

But this? This is so easy even a pumpkin could do it. This pumpkin butter can be eaten in one of two ways:

1. Directly out of the pot once it's cooked.

2. Saved in your fridge in an air-tight container and slathered on just about anything (I recommend all manner of carbs, especially a nice brioche from Levain Bakery).

And I highly recommend you experience both of the above. The spices and mild sweetness in this pumpkin butter make it an ideal pairing for something slightly sweet. For example, poured warm over vanilla or cinnamon ice cream. OR a bread with a sweetness to it, like brioche. The airy and chewy texture of brioche creates a perfect base for this hearty butter.

Or you could just eat it out of the container with a spoon. It's that good, I promise you. Here is how you make it:

What You Need:

1 1/2 cups of pumpkin puree (you can use canned or make your own like I did with these instructions).
3/4 cup apple cider
1 cup packed brown sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 cinnamon stick
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon allspice
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

What You Do:

Throw all the ingredients in a small pot over medium heat and mix well.

Bring the mixture to a boil for 1-2 minutes and then reduce the heat to a simmer.

Let everything simmer together for about 30-40 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes or so.

The pumpkin butter will start to thicken gradually.

When the pumpkin butter is thick enough, remove from heat and allow it to completely cool (unless you have ice cream on hand, in which case I would encourage you to eat it immediately). Divide into jars and store in the refrigerator.

Tuesday
Oct252011

Pumpkin Puree

I am trying to make use of every part of the pumpkin. And this next part - the pumpkin meat - is my favorite part.

Last week we roasted a wee little sugar pumpkin, remember?

That yielded some tasty-toasted pumpkin wedges. So let's start there.

What You Need:

Tasty-toasted roasted pumpkin wedges

water (about a cup)

a blender or food processor

What To Do:

Peel back the skin of the pumpkin and discard.

Chop the roasted pumpkin into chunks and pop them in the blender or food processor.

Add 1/4 cup of water to get things started and give it a whirl.

You may need a spatula to scrape down the sides of the bowl as it processes.

If things are looking a touch chunky, add some more water. As I said, you may need to add as much as a cup, but add it a little at a time, so you don't end up with watery puree. No one wants a water-logged puree.

That's it!

Scoop it out of your mixing device, and store it in a giant Ziploc baggie. You can even store it in the freezer if you would like to save some for later.

The things you can do with pumpkin puree are endless and include:

Filling for ravioli

Pumpkin butter

Crostini topping

Face mask (kidding)

Dinner table weaponry (poised on a spoon with good aim....)

Soup!

Ice Cream and semi freddo

Pie filling

So if you'll just bear with me over the next few weeks or so, I will try to go through all these. Or at least some of them. Feel free to vote for your favorite, and I will try and push those toward the front of the list!

Monday
Oct242011

Roasted Spiced Pumpkin Seeds

I originally made this recipe here. I have to say, I really dug those nuts. So easy, and you can make your own mix of nuts, you don't even have to use the ones I recommend. Although you should. You should do everything I tell you to do.

For example, you should totally alter this recipe to include pumpkin seeds. Pumpkin seeds are a meaty seed. Large and puffy, almost like a bean, they provide a chewy contrast to the snappier nut. I hear opposites attract...

Now, you could buy some pumpkin seeds. OR you could get enthusiastic, break out a large, sharp knife and serving spoon and a pumpkin of your choosing and harvest the seeds yourself. Do this while you are carving up your Halloween Jack-O-Lantern. It's fun. It's a mess. You'll love it.

What You Need:

3 Tbsp sugar

1 tsp paprika

1 tsp ground cinnamon

Pinch of ground cloves

3/4 tsp salt

1 large egg white

Mixture of unsalted nuts. I used: pecans, cashews and almonds. You can use whatever you like, just make sure you have about 2 cups worth.

What To Do:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly oil a 4-sided sheet pan. Whisk together the sugar, spices and salt in a small bowl. Whisk the egg white in a medium bowl until frothy, then stir in the nuts. Add the spice mixture and toss to coat evenly.

Spread the nut mixture on the sheet pan in one layer. Bake, stirring once or twice until dry and toasted, about 20 - 25 minutes. Loosen nuts from the pan and cool completely.

You can even make this one ahead and store in an air-tight container at room temperature for up to a week.

* Recipe adapted from Gourmet Magazine.

Friday
Oct212011

What To Do With a Pumpkin...We begin with roasting.

I would like a show of hands: How many of you walk by a pumpkin stand/farmer's market/any place they are selling pumpkins and get one for the sole purpose of carving it as a Jack-O-Lantern?

I'm not saying this is a bad thing – in fact The Box and I have a running yearly competition for the best carved pumpkin. Who do you think wins every year? I'll give you three guesses and the first two don't count.

But resigning the pumpkin to the realm of holiday decor really limits its capabilities in the edibility department. Because it is a very capable vegetable, people. I mean, look how robust it is! How....ORANGE!

So today, we begin with dissecting the pumpkin and pilfering its edible parts. We will eventually make stuff with these parts, but today we pilfer. Let it begin!

What You Need:

1 pumpkin (I like using the small sugar pumpkins. They are cute. Plus, I'm only one girl, how much pumpkin do you want me to eat?)

Roasting pan or baking sheet

A sharp knife

A large scooping spoon

A cutting board

What To Do:

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.

Using a large knife and cutting board and being VERY CAREFUL, cut the top off your pumpkin like so:

Scoop out the seeds and pumpkin guts.

The seeds are one of the pumpkin's edible parts. Try to separate them from the stringy guts (not so tasty), rinse them and let them dry. Find a safe place to keep them for a little while, like an air-tight container. We'll be coming back to them.

Slice your pumpkin in half and then into wedges. Place it in your roasting pan, or on a baking sheet.

Bake in the oven for 45 minutes or until the meat of the pumpkin is fork-tender (like a cooked potato).

The skin will blister a bit, and once the pumpkin has cooled, you can peel back the skin and — violá — edible pumpkin meat!

Stick it in the fridge as is, or cube it up.

Next week: Things to do with roasted, toasted pumpkin meat!