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Entries in pumpkin seeds (3)

Tuesday
Nov222011

A Plethora of Pumpkin Recipes – Our Second Online Magazine!

 

 

It's time! For two things: Thanksgiving and (even more exciting) our SECOND online magazine!

This magazine delivers you all our featured pumpkin recipes PLUS a very exciting new one. I haven't even posted it on the blog, that's how special it is.

What is it? Maybe you should flip through the magazine and find out, huh? I dare you....I DOUBLE mini pumpkin cheesecake dare you.

Yes, I do.

Monday
Oct242011

Roasted Spiced Pumpkin Seeds

I originally made this recipe here. I have to say, I really dug those nuts. So easy, and you can make your own mix of nuts, you don't even have to use the ones I recommend. Although you should. You should do everything I tell you to do.

For example, you should totally alter this recipe to include pumpkin seeds. Pumpkin seeds are a meaty seed. Large and puffy, almost like a bean, they provide a chewy contrast to the snappier nut. I hear opposites attract...

Now, you could buy some pumpkin seeds. OR you could get enthusiastic, break out a large, sharp knife and serving spoon and a pumpkin of your choosing and harvest the seeds yourself. Do this while you are carving up your Halloween Jack-O-Lantern. It's fun. It's a mess. You'll love it.

What You Need:

3 Tbsp sugar

1 tsp paprika

1 tsp ground cinnamon

Pinch of ground cloves

3/4 tsp salt

1 large egg white

Mixture of unsalted nuts. I used: pecans, cashews and almonds. You can use whatever you like, just make sure you have about 2 cups worth.

What To Do:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly oil a 4-sided sheet pan. Whisk together the sugar, spices and salt in a small bowl. Whisk the egg white in a medium bowl until frothy, then stir in the nuts. Add the spice mixture and toss to coat evenly.

Spread the nut mixture on the sheet pan in one layer. Bake, stirring once or twice until dry and toasted, about 20 - 25 minutes. Loosen nuts from the pan and cool completely.

You can even make this one ahead and store in an air-tight container at room temperature for up to a week.

* Recipe adapted from Gourmet Magazine.

Friday
Oct212011

What To Do With a Pumpkin...We begin with roasting.

I would like a show of hands: How many of you walk by a pumpkin stand/farmer's market/any place they are selling pumpkins and get one for the sole purpose of carving it as a Jack-O-Lantern?

I'm not saying this is a bad thing – in fact The Box and I have a running yearly competition for the best carved pumpkin. Who do you think wins every year? I'll give you three guesses and the first two don't count.

But resigning the pumpkin to the realm of holiday decor really limits its capabilities in the edibility department. Because it is a very capable vegetable, people. I mean, look how robust it is! How....ORANGE!

So today, we begin with dissecting the pumpkin and pilfering its edible parts. We will eventually make stuff with these parts, but today we pilfer. Let it begin!

What You Need:

1 pumpkin (I like using the small sugar pumpkins. They are cute. Plus, I'm only one girl, how much pumpkin do you want me to eat?)

Roasting pan or baking sheet

A sharp knife

A large scooping spoon

A cutting board

What To Do:

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.

Using a large knife and cutting board and being VERY CAREFUL, cut the top off your pumpkin like so:

Scoop out the seeds and pumpkin guts.

The seeds are one of the pumpkin's edible parts. Try to separate them from the stringy guts (not so tasty), rinse them and let them dry. Find a safe place to keep them for a little while, like an air-tight container. We'll be coming back to them.

Slice your pumpkin in half and then into wedges. Place it in your roasting pan, or on a baking sheet.

Bake in the oven for 45 minutes or until the meat of the pumpkin is fork-tender (like a cooked potato).

The skin will blister a bit, and once the pumpkin has cooled, you can peel back the skin and — violá — edible pumpkin meat!

Stick it in the fridge as is, or cube it up.

Next week: Things to do with roasted, toasted pumpkin meat!